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Upskilling made easy with remote online courses

In the modern workplace having a team of digital experts is vital, however, training is costly and very often time-consuming. 

That was until an innovative company called Bring Your Own Laptop was established.

The concept of 'bringing your own laptop' to a training class environment was first used by Bring Your Own Laptop in London in 2005 and proved to be hugely successful.

Since then, they have opened dedicated training centres in Sydney, Auckland and in Wellington, New Zealand.

Mobile working has now become the 'norm' and laptops, both pc and Mac, have become powerful tools in this changing work environment.

It is often advantageous to use your own tried and tested laptop for our courses as you will be aware of its capabilities and feel comfortable using it.

However, the modern workforce isn’t always able to travel long distances for training. 

Bring Your Own Laptop recently launched their online training courses to solve this problem.

The website aims to make it even easier to upskill your employees and give them the necessary digital know how.   

Bring Your Own Laptop online offers courses on the entire Adobe suite and students can log in from anywhere in New Zealand to access the digital courses. 

One of the best features is that the student can learn at their own pace, and thus their train can fit around even the most rigorous of work schedules. 

Students also retain access to all of the course materials for the duration of the subscription, so if they forget how to do something they can jump back and double check.

What really puts the cherry on the cake is that all of these learning tools are on offer for just $12 per month.

Flexibility is key and that’s why this is such a good opportunity to upskill.

To find out more about how you can take your workforce from digital sloths to digital superheroes click here

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