Story image

Mobile app development is not just for coders and programmers

12 Sep 2016

The growth of the rapid mobile app development (RMAD) market shows the pent-up demand for “coding-optional” tools to build apps quickly and cost-effectively. Application development leaders should evaluate and employ these tools to deliver business value more quickly for their enterprise mobile app strategies.

RMAD tools are a class of coding-optional tools that enable non-programmers to build mobile apps to support, at a minimum, iOS and Android devices.

These tools offer high productivity for developers and non-developers alike through a variety of approaches that both automate and abstract app development efforts, including drag-and-drop editors, code generation and orchestration, model-driven development, virtualisation, business process mapping, component assembly, app configuration and forms construction.

Many IT groups are unable to keep up with the growing demand for mobile apps within their organisations. Popular approaches to delivering mobile apps, using conventional coding (via native integrated development environment/software development kits and open-source frameworks) or mobile application development platforms (MADP), demand programmer skills that are in short supply and result in relatively long development times.

Alternative, faster approaches are required for rapid delivery by a wider range of mobile stakeholders, such as business analysts and marketing professionals. Tools that meet these needs can be classified as being “RMAD tools.” There is a burgeoning market for these tools that even MADP vendors are addressing in their front-end tools.

Users of these RMAD tools can come from many areas of an organisation and do not have to understand or learn the intricate details of mobile app mechanics, such as offline data synchronisation. Their objective is to produce useful apps as rapidly and as easily as they might create a presentation using a typical office productivity suite.

The demand and potential value of RMAD tools has generated large numbers of providers, many of which are small or specialist companies that have been in business for less than five years. This fragmentation has caused IT departments to look skeptically at these providers given their desire for well-established, long-term providers.

This skepticism is ill-advised, however, as mobile apps are fluid. With the constantly evolving device hardware and operating systems landscape, this fluidity will persist and will cause organisations to develop greenfield apps relatively frequently, giving organisations an opportunity to adopt best-in-class tools relatively regularly. The place to start investigating RMAD vendors is Gartner’s “2016 Market Guide for Rapid Mobile App Development Tools.“

Article by Jason Wong, Gartner research director.

Toshiba launches fast rotary cutter for B-EX6T1 printer
Intended primarily for industrial applications, these popular printers combine state-of-the-art technology with usability, reliability and low TCO.
How to avoid disappointment from SEO 'cowboys'
"Many business owners, even marketing managers, can find themselves out of pocket for thousands of dollars before they know it because they don't understand some of the fundamentals."
Why accelerating the uptake of tech in the NZ economy is crucial
“Historically, New Zealand has been more of a tech taker than a tech leader."
Breakthrough research to revolutionise internet communication
Every email, cell phone call and website visit is encoded into data and sent around the world by laser light.
Paving the road to self-sovereign identity using blockchain
Internet users are often required to input personal information and highly-valuable data from contact numbers to email addresses to make use of the various platforms and services available online.
Farmers looking for data to help change bad habits
It is no secret that agriculture is a massive cause of environmental issues in NZ. Farmers say they are willing to change, if they get the right data.
Gartner: A/NZ IT spending growth will surpass worldwide
2019 IT spending is expected to grow 2.2% in New Zealand, and 3% in Australia, far exceeding the 1.1% global average.
Six Easter eggs built into the Google search engine
Here’s a roundup of some of the best Easter eggs from Google Search even the sharpest among us may not have discovered yet.