Story image

Oracle lets SMBs create custom apps without software expertise

Oracle has announced a new service aiming to provide an easy way for business users to create their own web and mobile applications and host them in a cloud environment. 

Oracle Application Builder Cloud Service works through an intuitive visual development interface, with no need for prior development experience.

This could be a game changer for businesses and save smaller companies thousands of dollars in the long run.

It empowers business users with the ability to create and host their own applications, as well as extend Oracle SaaS applications.

It focuses on ease of use and an intuitive approach to application creation, as well as fast provisioning and publishing of these applications.

There is no coding involved in creating the app, making it extremely simple for anyone to take on, especially SMBs with limited resources to spend on app development. 

SMBs can also use it to create apps specific to their business functions customised to their needs without needing prior expertise or experience in software development.

The UI-first approach enables users to create applications interfaces in a visual environment with drag-and-drop simplicity. 

The built-in responsive UI design with finer control through properties, along with device preview capabilities, can simplify the creation of multi-channel user interfaces that are usable across desktop and mobile devices.

Applications can be previewed immediately on various device resolutions enabling the creator to test the application functionality.

Applications do have a 2GB limit, however.

This may be a great tool for customers looking to extend Oracle’s set of SaaS applications. 

The out-of-the-box support for Oracle’s Fusion and Alta look-and-feel promise to deliver applications with a consistent user experience. 

With an integrated service, the catalogue provides access to data objects exposed by Oracle’s SaaS applications. 

The program also boasts a shared security layer across applications, supporting single sign-on between Oracle Application Builder Cloud Service applications and Oracle’s SaaS applications.

Possible applications for the program include creating or expanding Oracle applications for an expense claim system, budget planner or a conference tracker. 

Currently, there are only two reasons why this software isn’t seeing higher adoption: Small sale value and initial integration.

Oracle has ensured there a number of online tutorials available, making its learning curve even easier. 

You can see the product in action here:

Report finds GCSB in compliance with NZ rights
The Inspector-General has given the GCSB its compliance tick of approval for the fourth year in a row.
Preparing for e-invoicing requirements
The New Zealand and Australian governments are working on a joint approach to create trans-Tasman standards to e-invoicing that’ll make it easier for businesses in both countries work with each other and across the globe
5c more per share: Trade Me bidding war heats up
Another bidder has entered the bidding arena as the potential sale of Trade Me kicks up a notch.
Hootsuite's five social trends marketers should take note of
These trends should keep marketers, customer experience leaders, social media professionals and executives awake at night.
Company-X celebrates ranking on Deloitte's Fast 500 Asia Pacific
Hamilton-based software firm Company-X has landed a spot on Deloitte Technology’s Fast 500 Asia Pacific 2018 ranking - for the second year in a row.
Entrepreneur reactivates business engagement in AU Super funds
10 million workers leave it up to employers to choose their Super fund for them – and the majority of employers are just as passive and unengaged at putting that fund to work.
Tether: The Kiwi startup fighting back against cold, damp homes
“Mould and mildew are the new asbestos. But unlike asbestos, detecting the presence – or conditions that encourage growth – of mould and mildew is nearly impossible."
Capitalising on exponential IT
"Exponential IT must be a way of life, not just an endpoint."