Story image

Wellington showing off blockchain and AR innovation for Techweek ’18

22 May 2018

An increasing number of ground-breaking New Zealand tech designers are collaborating with the wider business world to produce one of the fastest growing segments of tech.

NZTech chief executive Graeme Muller says the country’s best developers, designers and tech geniuses will attend an all-day conference about creative technology in Wellington on May 24 as part of Techweek’18.

Kiwis are becoming successful in commercialising creative technology, Muller says.

“I get inspired by hearing what a lot of these game developers, blockchain, wearable tech, augmented reality and health tech experts, are doing.

“Creative Realities is a collaboration between local Wellington entrepreneur Jessica Manins and Techweek, New Zealand’s annual festival of innovation presented by NZTech and supported by MBIE,” says Muller.

“Artificial intelligence, blockchain and augmented reality might sound like buzzwords but when you see them in action, it’s a lot easier to understand how New Zealand, as a nation, can solve global problems using this technology,” Manins says.

Blockchain is the first successfully tested distributed ledger technology, paving the way for business models that haven’t been possible before and will be one of the key technology topics discussed at the event with global leaders SingularDTV, a Blockchain Entertainment Studio, joining the event from the United States.

business development manager G. Thomas Esmay will speak about how his company is bringing mathematics to the entertainment industry, and how they are empowering artists through applications to manage and create projects from development to distribution.

As well as keynotes there will be hands-on practical workshops including a session with IBM on implementing Artificial Intelligence in your business.

The recent AI report Shaping a Future New Zealand put together by the AI Forum predicts that by 2035, AI has the potential to increase New Zealand GDP by up to $54 billion and that 44% consider education a key barrier to AI adoption.

“To create a more equal world, to encourage collaborations and grow our economy, we must focus on creativity and collaboration,” Manins says.

“We need to use the technology as a tool and our creative minds as a way to solve problems.” Other speakers taking the stage at the Techweek event include Parrot Analytics chief executive Wared Seger.

Parrot Analytics has been recognised as one of the five hottest television startups in the world, and one of the 50 most powerful.

Another speaker is Maheera Wiki, a year 9 student at Newlands College who’s a self-taught developer working in mixed reality.

You’ll also hear from The Breast Cancer Foundation, which is developing technology-led programmes that will extend its ability to support patients NZ-wide.

This includes a VR support tool for people with advanced breast cancer and a “virtual nurse” service.

The Creative Realities event will include over 20 speakers, multiple workshops and hands-on demonstrations.

When: Thursday 24 May, 8am-6pm

Where: Shed 6 Wellington

Tickets: $295, students $95

Hands-on review: Playing the long game with the The iPhone XR
The red XR is a rare case of having a phone that’s ‘too pretty to be covered’ - and it’s not hard to see why.
What the future of fibre looks like in NZ
The Commerce Commission has released its emerging views paper on the rules, requirements and processes which will underpin the new regulatory regime for New Zealand’s fibre networks.
Gen Z confidence in the economy is on the decline
Businesses need to work hard to improve their reputations.
Why NZ businesses have less than two years to adopt digital before disruption hits
Research found that digital disruption is already impacting two-thirds of New Zealand organisations.
Infratil seeks clearance to acquire up to 50% stake in Vodafone NZ
The commission will give clearance to a proposed merger if they are satisfied that the merger is unlikely to have the effect of substantially lessening competition in a market.
Hands-on review: MiniTool Power Data Recovery Software
I came across a wee gem of advice when researching the world of data recovery. As soon as you get that sinking feeling and realise you’ve lost a file, stop using your computer.
Deepfakes the 'next wave of concern' - but can law really stomp it out?
Enforcing the existing law will be difficult enough, and it is not clear that any new law would be able to do better. Overseas attempts to draft law for deepfakes have been seriously criticised.
Acquia delivers open source framework for contextual commerce
The framework connects the Drupal open source web content management system with e-commerce platforms from Acquia partners.