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Digital directory boards light the way

01 Apr 16

Digital signage is proving more popular than traditional mediums, according to a new survey.

Australian company Just Digital Signage says advances in technology have seen consumption and communication move to a digital space.

In a company blog post, JDS says digital directory boards are a part of that trend, with commercial properties favouring smarter, more sophisticated ways to manage the tenant list.

Half the people surveyed in an OTX (Online Testing Exchange) study showed that people prefer digital signage to traditional mediums as it catches their attention, and is deemed more interesting and entertaining, JDS says.

Furthermore, an InfoTrends study confirmed digital displays not only increase visitor traffic by a third, but also increases the average purchase amounts by 30%.

According to JDS, those consumer preferences and business incentives are driving digital signage uptake by 40% per year, with annual growth expected to continue at 8.94% through 2020.

JDS says before a company joins the wave of adopters, it is important to understand how the digital format works so they can implement a seamless upgrade for their directory.

Just Digital Signage has compiled a tech checklist to get you started and avoid the roadblocks:

  • Use commercial LCD panels, not TVs. Due to the cost there is a real temptation to use a consumer TV and not invest in a commercial LCD panel.  “Regular TVs are not designed to operate for extended business hours, which will lead to a shortened product life cycle on your screen,” JDS says.
  • Most digital directory boards are installed with the screen rotated into a portrait orientation that allows the occupied tenants to be listed down the screen. TVs are not designed to operate in this configuration. “Using a TV in this way will lead to overheating issues reducing the operating life of the panel TV, which in most cases voids the warranty.”
  • Updating the tenant list can now be achieved with a USB memory stick, JDS says. “This computer technology maybe impressive, but you will still need to make manual changes and create the image file that will be displayed which can be a slow and frustrating process. The smarter, and more cost effective way to change your content is via a cloud-based software solution that uses the internet to simplify the process. “All you need to do is supply your digital directory board with an internet connection. This ongoing system can be set-up via DigitalDirectoryBoards.com.”
  • JDS says mounting the screen with a standard wall mount will work however is likely to look cheap, and the screen isn’t very secure. “Investing in a powder-coated metal enclosure with a toughed glass front panel will give your directory board maximum holding power and a slick finish.”
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