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Kiwi innovators: Entries for the Māori innovation comp close soon

28 Mar 17

There is an innovation challenge for Māori entrepreneurs that awards winners with $10,000 worth of start-up assistance.

The competition is open to Māori 15 years and older - the only prerequisite for entry is an exciting, innovative and entrepreneurial idea. 

DIGMYIDEA is urging people to put forward their ideas, regardless of what they think of it, for the experience of simply being involved is rewarding. 

“Even if the idea doesn’t fly, being involved in an innovation challenge like this could be the perfect platform to an even bigger and better idea,” says Robett Hollis, founder of Aranui Ventures and judge of DIGMYIDEA. 

The competition aims to attract more Māori to the digital economy by helping emerging innovators turn their creative ideas into reality. 

The competition will be stiff. The high-calibre entries received so far range from digital applications that help to revitalise Te Reo Māori in schools to interactive games about Māori history. 

“DIGMYIDEA aims to stimulate the interest and involvement of Māori within New Zealand’s innovation ecosystem, which is an important part of building the technology sector, and a unique point of difference both at home and on the world stage,” says Patrick McVeigh, Auckland tourism events and economic development general manager business, innovation and skills.

Ideas should have the potential to create economic opportunities for Māori and other New Zealanders, and they should be submitted soon as entries close this Friday.

From each of the two age categories, five finalists will take part in the mentoring workshop DIGIwānanga. Winners will be announced on 14th May 2017.

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