Story image

Do Not Knock stickers to deter door-to-door sellers

04 Nov 2014

Consumer NZ has launched a nationwide campaign to fight back against dodgy door-to-door sellers.

Sue Chetwin, Consumer NZ chief executive says Consumer was launching the campaign because of the serious complaints it continues to get about door-to-door sellers.

“We get regular complaints about the hard-sell and exploitative sales tactics these traders use. Many cases involve elderly or vulnerable consumers, pressured to sign up for products they don’t want and can’t afford,” she says.

“We’ve dealt with cases involving elderly people sold $3000 vacuum cleaners that clean no better than vacuums you can buy for $100. We’ve also dealt with complaints from consumers pressured to buy grossly overpriced beds and other household goods they couldn’t afford and had to go into debt to purchase.”

As part of its campaign, Consumer is distributing free “Do Not Knock” stickers. The stickers will give people a way to tell door-to-door sellers they’re not welcome.

“We’re encouraging people who don’t want door-to-door sellers to knock to put a sticker on their letterbox, front gate or front door,” Ms Chetwin said.

A recent Consumer NZ survey found 70 percent of its members disliked door-to-door salespeople and wanted them to stop calling. Over 60 percent dubbed these traders “annoying” and “intrusive”.

Survey respondents also complained of pushy door-to-door sellers who wouldn’t take “no” for an answer. Several members said they had to threaten to call the police to get the salesperson to leave.

Chetwin says everybody had an implied licence to enter your property and knock on your door. But you can revoke a salesperson’s licence to enter your property by displaying a “Do Not Knock” sticker. If a door-to-door seller ignores the sticker, they’re likely to be trespassing, she explains.

Consumer is also calling for changes to the Fair Trading Act to make it an offence for sellers to ignore a “Do Not Knock” sign. Australia has already strengthened its laws. Door-to-door sellers there can be fined if they ignore a “Do Not Knock” sticker. Chetwin says Consumer wants to see a similar law change here.

More details of the campaign can be found at www.consumer.org.nz/donotknock

Apple's AirPods now come with 'Hey Siri' functionality
The new AirPods come with a standard case or a Wireless Charging Case that holds additional charges for more than 24 hours of listening time.
NZ investment funds throw weight against social media giants
A consortium of NZ funds managing assets worth more than $90m are appealing against Facebook, Twitter, and Google following the Christchurch terror attacks.
Poly appoints new A/NZ managing director, Andy Hurt
“We’re excited to be bringing together two established pioneers in audio and video technology to be moving forward and one business – Poly."
NVIDIA announces Jetson Nano: A US$99 tiny, yet mighty AI computer 
“Jetson Nano makes AI more accessible to everyone, and is supported by the same underlying architecture and software that powers the world's supercomputers.”
Unity and NVIDIA announce real-time ray tracing across industries
For situations that demand maximum photorealism and the highest visual fidelity, ray tracing provides reflections and accurate dynamic computations for global lighting.
Slack doubles down on enterprise key management
EKM adds an extra layer of protection so customers can share conversations, files, and data while still meeting their own risk mitigation requirements.
NVIDIA introduces a new breed of high-performance workstations
“Data science is one of the fastest growing fields of computer science and impacts every industry."
Apple says its new iMacs are "pretty freaking powerful"
The company has chosen the tagline “Pretty. Freaking powerful” as the tagline – and it’s not too hard to see why.