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Does it pay to be a startup founder?

15 Jan 14

Compass has released data to suggest how much startup founders should be paying themselves.

Conducting research on 11,160 startups around the globe, the report shows in Silicon Valley that 75% of founders pay themselves less than US$75,000 per year, with 66% receiving less than US$50,000.

The study also claims the average salary of a startup founder varied from US$32,000 in India to over $72,000 in Australia & New Zealand.

Being cost conscious could be determining factor to any startup's success and a founder's salary is no true indication of the popularity or success of a startup. Some consider the average salary to be strikingly low, especially across Silicon Valley - an area that has a high cost of living.

Startups are usually not so transparent when it comes to divulging salaries, so data analysts have found it interesting to gather some aggregate data and information about the areas salary landscape.

With the latest figures it seems as though the image of startup founders jetting around the globe, partying and drinking champagne is now a thing of the past.

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