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Have you registered your .nz domain name?

02 Mar 15

Do you have a .nz domain name? You may have special registration and reservation rights for the new, shorter .nz version. However, you’ve only got until 1pm, 30 March 2015 so visit getyourselfonline.nz now to find out more.  

.nz domain names – preferential rights expire 1pm, March 30

As of September 2014 any person or business can now get shorter .nz domain names, for example, anyname.nz, in addition to all existing registration options like ‘.co.nz’, ‘.org.nz’ and ‘.net.nz’.

Domain name holders should already have heard from their provider about this change and what it means. For most there are options to choose from, options that will expire at 1pm, 30 March 2015.

You could have preferential eligibility

For people or businesses already with a website or email address ending with .nz, they may be able to register or reserve the shorter .nz version of their domain name before anyone else.

To see if you have preferential eligibility, talk to your domain name provider about your options or visit getyourselfonline.nz.

Preferential registration/reservation rights expire 1pm, 30 March 2015

If you are eligible to register or reserve the shorter version of your name, you need to decide if you want to do so by 1pm, 30 March 2015.

If you don’t, then the shorter version of your domain name will become available for someone else to register. Even if this happens, though, your existing domain name (e.g. your ‘.co.nz’ or ‘.net.nz’) will still be yours as long as it remains registered to you.

‘Conflicted’ names dealt with at anyname.nz

Some .nz domain names are ‘conflicted’, which means they’ve been registered in at least two different second levels. For example, you might hold the .co.nz version, while another person might hold the .net.nz or .org.nz version.

If your name is conflicted you’re able to go to the Domain Name Commission’s anyname.nz site and lodge a preference for who might get the new, shorter .nz version of the name. There’s no date or time limit for lodging a conflict preference.  

Remember…

  • Check your eligibility at getyourselfonline.nz or contact your domain name provider. 
  • If you’re eligible to register or reserve the short version of your name, you’ve only got until 1pm, 30 March 2015 to take action.
  • Registering can be done through any .nz domain name provider. Reserving is done on the anyname.nz site.
  • Anyname.nz is also where you can lodge a conflict preference if the short version of your name is conflicted. 
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