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How is InternetNZ making a better world through better internet?

30 Nov 16

A completely non-profit group with an open membership, InternetNZ provides community funding to promote research and informs Kiwis on all things internet. 

Not only that, but the organisation was also an early supporter of the fibre broadband initiative 10 years ago.

Based in Wellington, with an office in Auckland and a team of 14, InternetNZ strongly advocates the open internet and have three core focuses that they’ve worked on for 2016.   

Number one being access to the internet, the second is use of the internet for everyone’s benefit and the third is based around security and privacy.

Jordan Carter, chief executive of InternetNZ, explains how they really tried to focus on what matters most.

“How can you make a better world through better internet? Well you have to get online,” he says.

“One of the things we’re actually doing is asking people what they think the biggest issues facing the internet for Kiwis are,” explains Carter.

“We’ll ask our members, we’ll ask it publicly and we’ll ask our stakeholders.”

Recently, InternetNZ commissioned research through UMR to find out what the public believes the issues are.  

“A lot of people are really concerned about security on the net. Which really draws back to one of our main focus areas,” says Carter.

“The research showed that 89% of people believe the positives of using the Internet outweigh the negatives. But it also showed they are aware of the security and privacy aspects of it - which is a good thing."

As far as next year goes, the organisation will continue to follow different acts, including Telco and the possible Copyright review.  

“This review of the Telco act will probably lead to legislation next year, so we’ll be working on that and making sure that consumers aren’t ripped off,” says Carter.

“We also think there’s going to be a review of Copyright next year, so it will be interesting to see how the TPPA deal lands with America saying it’s not going to be a part of it.”

Next year, InternetNZ will bring back its national NetHui event and hold it in either Auckland or Wellington.

They also plan to create a more evident research programme, continuing their work in the Access, Use and Security focus areas.

“Another project that we’re trying to work on is around private messaging, to try and normalise or get people to think about sending private messages,” says Carter.

“A lot of people are starting to think about it, but a lot don’t. So we’re trying to come up with a way to really get that security message across.”

The organisation will continue its Speaker Series innovation next year, with a look to improve its service to members too. 

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