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Kiwi carpooling app takes aim at Uber over Trump

02 Feb 17

New Zealand-based social carpooling app Chariot is encouraging Kiwis to delete the Uber app, in what it says is a protest to the ride-sharing company’s ‘pro-Trump stance’.

While Chariot’s suggestion to delete Uber could be considered a thinly veiled attempt to get users to jump ship, Uber has come under fire in the U.S for lowering fares and driving passengers during a one-hour taxi strike to John F Kenny International Airport in New York on Saturday.

The strike was a protest against Donald Trump’s controversial (disgusting) ban on refugees and citizens from seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States.

“New Zealand is a land of immigration and at Chariot, we welcome everyone, regardless of religion, culture or gender,” Chariot boss Thomas Kiefer says.

"We also believe that genuine sharing - rather than profit creation - delivers better outcomes for drivers and passengers alike,” he says.

Uber’s co-founder and CEO, Travis Kalanick, is on Trump’s economic advisory group, a move which has prompted strong criticism against the company.

Kiefer says Kiwis can “vote with their phones” to show their opposition to Trump - and Uber - by deleting the Uber app and - wait for it - by downloading Chariot as an alternative.

Chariot’s carpooling app launched in New Zealand in mid-late 2016 and has since attracted 5000 users.

We have reached out to Uber New Zealand for response to Chariot’s claims Uber is pro-Trump.

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