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Kiwi company launches DIY wireless asset tracker

New Zealand ISP Wireless Nation is launching an asset locating tracker which could save thousands of dollars for many businesses and individuals. 

The Fox Tracker is a small device which connects to the global Sigfox network being rolled out throughout New Zealand.
The network is specifically designed to enable the Internet of Things devices because it draws far less energy from connected devices than traditional networks. 

As a result, the Fox Tracker can operate for three to four years off just three AA batteries.

Wireless Nation marketing manager Miro Sudzum says, “This is an absolute game-changer for New Zealand, there’s a low-cost product in the market to locate or track personal and business assets, or even people.

“It’s totally wireless and waterproof so DIY installation is easy, the Fox Tracker fits in a person’s palm and can be attached to or put inside anything, from shipping containers to vehicles, farm equipment to tramping packs.”

“It makes so much sense for New Zealand because our country is one of the most mountainous so being trackable can mean the difference between life and death for people exploring the outdoors, for businesses, knowing exactly where your shipments or fleet vehicles are can lead to better business decisions and optimisations which save thousands of dollars.”

What makes the Fox Tracker so disruptive is not only its battery life but also its affordability and ease-of-use. 

Depending on required features, it will sell in New Zealand for between $120 and $160 a unit, with a yearly subscription of less than $200.

Unlike traditional tracking hardware used in commercial vehicle fleets which require expensive components and need to be wired up, the Fox Tracker is a fully independent unit which can be deployed immediately. 

The units’ locations can be tracked on the Wireless Nation website, or through iOS and Android apps.

Sudzum concludes, “This truly is place-and-trace, all you do is attach or place the device and you have instant real-time tracking of your most valuable assets for an absolute fraction of the cost of traditional methods. 

“Change the batteries every few years and you have a system which will give you peace-of-mind and data for life.”

“The Fox Tracker does for less than $200 what some systems do for thousands of dollars when it comes to business decisions, data is king and we’re very proud to help make crucial data more accessible and cheaper for New Zealand businesses.” 

The potential applications for the Fox Tracker are hugely varied and the potential commercial benefits could be enormous.

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