Story image

Organisations are severely lacking in cybersecurity maturity

16 Jun 15

Overall, organisations are displaying a lack of maturity and an over reliance on prevention when it comes to security, according to RSA Research.

RSA, the security division of EMC, released its inaugural Cybersecurity Poverty Index that compiled survey results from more than 400 security professionals across 61 countries.

While larger organisations are typically thought of as having the resources to mount a more substantive cyber defence, the results of the survey indicate that size is not a determinant of strong cybersecurity maturity and nearly 75% of all respondents self-reported insufficient levels of security maturity. 

The lack of overall maturity is not surprising as many organisations surveyed reported security incidents that resulted in loss or damage to their operations over the past 12 months, says RSA.

The most mature capability revealed in the research was the area of protection.

The research results showed organisations' most mature area of their cybersecurity program and capabilities are in preventative solutions, despite the common understanding that preventative strategies and solutions alone are insufficient in the face of more advanced attacks. 

Further, the greatest weakness of the organisations surveyed is the ability to measure, assess and mitigate cybersecurity risk, with 45% of those surveyed describing their capabilities in this area as ‘non-existent’, or ‘ad hoc’, and only 21% reporting that they are mature in this domain.

This shortfall makes it difficult or impossible to prioritise security activity and investment, a foundational activity for any organisation looking to improve their security capabilities today, says RSA.

Counter to expectations, the research indicates that the size of an organisation is not an indicator of maturity.

In fact, 83% of organisations surveyed with more than 10,000+ employees rated their capabilities as less than ‘developed’ in overall maturity.

This result suggests that large organisations' overall experience and visibility into advanced threats dictate the need for greater maturity than their current standing.

Large organisations' weak self-assessed maturity ratings indicate their understanding of the need to move to detect and response solutions and strategies for a more robust and mature security.

"This research demonstrates that enterprises continue to pour vast amounts of money into next generation firewalls, anti-virus, and advanced malware protection in the hopes of stopping advanced threats. 

"Despite investment in these areas, however, even the biggest organisations still feel unprepared for the threats they are facing," says Amit Yoran, RSA president. 

"We believe this dichotomy is a result of the failure of today's prevention-based security models to address the advancing threat landscape. 

"We need to change the way we think about security and that starts by acknowledging that prevention alone is a failed strategy and more attention needs to be spent on strategy based on detection and response."

Also countering expectations were the results from financial services organisations, a sector often cited as industry-leading in terms of security maturity.

Despite conventional wisdom, however, the financial services organisations surveyed did not rank themselves as the most mature industry, with only one third rating as well-prepared.

Critical infrastructure operators will need to make significant steps forward in their current levels of maturity, according to RSA.

Organisations in the telecommunications industry reported the highest level of maturity with 50% of respondents having developed or advantaged capabilities, while Government ranked last across industries in the survey, with only 18% of respondents ranking as developed or advantaged.

The lower self-assessments of maturity in otherwise notably mature industries suggest a greater understanding of the advanced threat landscape and their need to build more mature capabilities to match it.  

Organisations in APJ reported the most mature security strategies with 39% ranked as developed or advantaged in overall maturity while only 26% of organisations in EMEA and 24% of organisations in the Americas rated as developed or advantaged.

How blockchain will impact NZ’s economy
Distributed ledgers and blockchain are anticipated to provide a positive uplift to New Zealand’s economy.
25% of malicious emails still make it through to recipients
Popular email security programmes may fail to detect as much as 25% of all emails with malicious or dangerous attachments, a study from Mimecast says.
Human value must be put back in marketing - report
“Digital is now so widely adopted that its novelty has worn off. In their attempt to declutter, people are being more selective about which products and services they incorporate into their daily lives."
Wine firm uses AR to tell its story right on the bottle
A Central Otago wine company is using augmented reality (AR) and a ‘digital first’ strategy to change the way it builds its brand and engages with customers.
DigiCert conquers Google's distrust of Symantec certs
“This could have been an extremely disruptive event to online commerce," comments DigiCert CEO John Merrill. 
Protecting organisations against internal fraud
Most companies tend to take a basic approach that focuses on numbers and compliance, without much room for grey areas or negotiation.
Telesmart to deliver Cloud Calling for Microsoft Teams
The integration will allow Telesmart’s Cloud Calling for Microsoft Teams to natively enable external voice connectivity from within Teams collaborative workflow environment.
Jade Software & Ambit take chatbots to next level of AI
“Conversation Agents present a huge opportunity to increase customer and employee engagement in a cost-effective manner."