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Red Hat and Samsung, teaming up to tackle enterprise mobility

25 Jun 2015

Red Hat has entered into a strategic alliance with Samsung Electronics, with the aim of delivering the next generation of mobile solutions to the enterprise.

The alliance brings together Samsung’s mobile device portfolio and Red Hat’s open source middleware, mobile and cloud technologies.

Red Hat specialises in application development and deployments on-premise and across private, public and hybrid cloud environments.

Sansung has extended its offering of consumer products to business services, and now has a portfolio of technologies targeted for business users, including smartphones, wearables, tablets, digital displays, hospitality TVs and printers.

The pair have said they will deliver mobile solutions that enable fast deployment and integration of enterprise applications for organisations moving toward a mobile-first strategy.

Samsung Business Services and Red Hat plan to deliver:

Business applications

A series of enterprise-ready industry-specific mobile applications that will run on the Red Hat Mobile Application Platform and address key workforce management and business tasks including business intelligence, field and customer service, inventory management and sales catalogue, pricing, ordering, and invoicing.

The applications will be designed so that they can be customised by an organisation.

The mobile applications will run on Android and other operating environments via the Red Hat Mobile Application Platform, and will be configurable to integrate into common enterprise back-end systems.

A developer ecosystem

Tools and resources to build a new ecosystem of enterprise partners and developers to build and launch solutions that meet customers' mobility needs.

Support services

Integrated support for customers and partners, Enterprise Mobility Management (EMM), and global delivery and support services for the Red Hat Mobile Application Platform.

Business collaboration

Red Hat and Samsung Business Services plan to actively engage in joint go-to-market activities for the solutions developed through the alliance.

“Effective and successful enterprise mobility strategies take into account both platforms and devices, and how they come together to help enable powerful end-to-end mobile solutions,” says Craig Muzilla, Red Hat senior vice president Application Platforms Business.

“We believe deeply in the power of collaboration, and we're excited to join with Samsung in not only delivering a new generation of mobile solutions for the enterprise, but in empowering customers to achieve new levels of innovation in mobile,” he says.

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