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Startup and Twitter combine to unearth future talent

03 Feb 14

Twitter will start to open up its public and private music data to 300 Entertainment, a startup that plans to analyse the information to pinpoint emerging artists, and help record labels, brands and musicians understand it all.

"Music is the largest topic of conversation on Twitter, so we're really invested in building a win-win environment for fans, artists, labels, promoters and music services," Bob Moz, Twitter's head of music, told Mashable. "This partnership is a great example because it is about helping artists and labels find each other. We're looking forward to working with [300 Entertainment head Lyor Cohen's] team in the coming months, and we hope they find great artists to sign as a result."

Not a great deal is known about 300 Entertainment, but The New York Times reported the company "signs artists for recorded music, publishing and other deals," and is lead by Lyor Cohen, "one of music’s biggest power brokers."

The music-discovery approach sounds key to what Twitter #Music, the mobile app and desktop service, set out to do when it launched in April 2013. Although there have been rumours of its demise due to its lack of popularity, yet the service is still available.

300 Entertainment shared the news on Twitter after the deal was announced.


 

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