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Why NZ businesses must adopt a ‘cloud-first’ policy for new IT projects...

16 Sep 14

In today’s business environment it is critical to consider cloud options for new IT projects.

Organisations should, if they haven’t already, review their current IT processes and determine how a cloud strategy can support or enhance the business.

“Adopting a ‘cloud-first’ policy for new projects involves considering cloud-based solutions first for any new application requests," says Ian Poole, CEO, UXC Connect.

“To realise the benefits of a clearly-defined cloud environment, businesses need to be smart about how they map the transition from their current IT environment.

"CxOs must create a cloud decision framework to keep technology evaluations and investments aligned with business strategies."

With this change, Poole believes there will be risks and costs that businesses need to be prepared for.

For instance, if a business hasn’t defined its transition process, it will hit a few bumps in the road when reengineering the IT environment, including the current applications that will operate in the cloud.

Poole says organisations also need pay close attention to issues relating to data sovereignty, particularly when sensitive company or client information migrates to the new cloud environment.

“Despite the risks there are some key benefits that businesses can expect to achieve by implementing a cloud strategy," he adds.

"The cloud will reduce overhead costs for IT and support a dynamic, nimble workforce that can work remotely with flexibility.

"This is something that is increasingly important for companies looking to attract, retain and develop the best people in their organisation.

"However, businesses cannot realise these benefits without clearly defining how a cloud environment will improve the current business processes, which means a clear cloud strategy and roadmap need to be developed when implementing a cloud-first policy.”

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