Story image

Wi-Fi and connected devices increase security risks

20 Jun 2016

Access to the internet provides people in develop and developing countries the opportunity to increase their economic growth, improve their social mobility and computer literacy as well as enrich their education prospects.

That’s the word from the people behind World Wi-Fi Day, a global initiative to help bridge the digital divide. World Wi-Fi Day is celebrated around the world today, June 20th.

By 2020, there should be about 40 billion connected devices. Currently, there are about four billion people around the world with no internet access.

According to security specialists ESET, the increase in connected devices means the need for more Wi-Fi technologies as well as a possible increase of related-risks.

“World Wi-Fi Day marks a significant technological revolution in the way we now communicate, work, and live our lives,” comments ESET security expert, Nick FitzGerald.

“Wi-Fi and internet access has become such an intrinsic part of our day-to-day living that we often take it for granted or don’t think about the effects of using it,” he says.

“Smartphone and internet users shouldn’t forget or overlook security best practices and the risks public Wi-Fi can present,” FitzGerald warns.

“Most public Wi-Fi networks are unencrypted and can actually become an easy gateway for hackers to personal or professional information,” he explains.

“Because of their ease of use and increasing accessibility, Wi-Fi is often overlooked as a potential major risk to personal safety and data security.”

To minimise the risks associated with logging onto any public Wi-Fi network, ESET suggests users follow these important steps:

             1.      Check the authenticity of the hotspot and confirm the correct network name and password (if any) with the owner. If there              is no WPA or WPA2 password, the connection is unencrypted and, therefore, significantly more risky

2.      Look for HTTPS and ensure the web pages you visit are encrypted where possible

3.      Patch and update software on a regular basis, particularly your antivirus solutions

4.      Avoid accessing sensitive information such as your email, online banking and credit cards accounts when using public Wi-Fi

5.      Manually select your Wi-Fi networks, rather than have it automatically connect

6.      Use a virtual private network (VPN), which provide encryption and security across public networks

7.      Use additional security tools, such as Tor and “HTTPS everywhere” browser add-ons, where possible

8.      Enable two-factor authentication (2FA) where possible

9.      Log out of each website and account after each use

10.   Turn off Wi-Fi when not in use”

Apple's AirPods now come with 'Hey Siri' functionality
The new AirPods come with a standard case or a Wireless Charging Case that holds additional charges for more than 24 hours of listening time.
NZ investment funds throw weight against social media giants
A consortium of NZ funds managing assets worth more than $90m are appealing against Facebook, Twitter, and Google following the Christchurch terror attacks.
Poly appoints new A/NZ managing director, Andy Hurt
“We’re excited to be bringing together two established pioneers in audio and video technology to be moving forward and one business – Poly."
NVIDIA announces Jetson Nano: A US$99 tiny, yet mighty AI computer 
“Jetson Nano makes AI more accessible to everyone, and is supported by the same underlying architecture and software that powers the world's supercomputers.”
Unity and NVIDIA announce real-time ray tracing across industries
For situations that demand maximum photorealism and the highest visual fidelity, ray tracing provides reflections and accurate dynamic computations for global lighting.
Slack doubles down on enterprise key management
EKM adds an extra layer of protection so customers can share conversations, files, and data while still meeting their own risk mitigation requirements.
NVIDIA introduces a new breed of high-performance workstations
“Data science is one of the fastest growing fields of computer science and impacts every industry."
Apple says its new iMacs are "pretty freaking powerful"
The company has chosen the tagline “Pretty. Freaking powerful” as the tagline – and it’s not too hard to see why.